Tag Archives: pink

sedum

6 Sep

naneliotrosegarden2013 004The sedums are beginning to bloom, a true indicator that the season for new blossoms is nearly over.  Sedum is such an easy-to-grow plant every garden should have at least a few.  To the left is Autumn Joy, identified by its red stems.  Below are the common (“Live-Forever”) and white-blooming, variegated leaf varieties.

sedum2013 001Sedums can be grown in sun or shade, form 18″-24″ inch clumps, and are easy to propagate — just bury the bottom 3″-4″ of a cut stem and keep the soil moist.

sedum2013 005Sedums come in a variety of color combinations, including a deep purple-leafed variety.  Except for the white variegated sedum, most flower in similar clumps of pink, star-shaped blossoms.

obedient plant – physostegia

6 Sep

obedient plant 2013 004A late season bloomer, obedient plant is showing the effects of some very hot, dry weather recently.  The usual pattern of rows of four blossoms surrounding each stalk is interrupted by some that withered when temperatures reached 100 F.  Still nice to see color this late in the summer, though.

obedient plant 2013 006

surprise lily – amaryllis belladonna

7 Aug

surpriselily2013 005Surprise lilies are beginning to open throughout the garden.  These come up as clusters of strap-like leaves, about 15″ long, each Spring.  They die back completely by late Spring and it’s easy to forget they’re there.  In late Summer, long (15″-24″) stems emerge with circles of pink lilies.  Also called Resurrection Lilies, Painted Ladies, Naked Ladies, and a variety of other names, they’re a nice late Summer surprises in any garden.  surpriselily2013 007Be sure to plant them among other flowers.  Otherwise, when the leaves die back you’ll be left with a bare patch for most of the season.

garden phlox

12 Jul

phlox 002A nice, old-fashioned garden plant, these phlox were moved from a bed in front where they really didn’t fit in to one of the beds in back.  They seem to like it here.  In front, they grew to a height of about 2′.  In this bed they’re already more than 5′ tall — and to think I worried they’d get lost among all the other flowers in this bed.

double rose of sharon – althea

12 Jul

Last month I showed you some of the single-petalled Rose of Sharon bushes as they came into bloom.  Now the doubles are blooming as well.  Perhaps not as exotic looking as the singles, the doubles are more well behaved — no seed pods sending up volunteers all over the garden.rose of sharon 004

I think I also mentioned that some of the purple and white singles had cross pollinated, producing a sort of salmon/pink flower.  Those have begun opening as well.rose of sharon 010All the Rose of Sharon bushes are loaded with buds and there should be continuous flowers right up to frost.

astilbe

18 Jun

astilbeThe astilbe is back, bigger and better than ever.  It really seems to like its new home in this small bed where it’s partially in the shade with just a bit of morning sun.

lamb’s ear – stachys

9 Jun

penstemon 008penstemon 003Lamb’s ear probably should be categorized as a ground cover because of the way it spreads.  In fact, give it enough sun and it will take over a garden.  The flowers are tiny, pink, and only visible if you look closely along the stem between the leaves.